Video #4: Eyestrain? Tension headaches? Try this.

Do you suffer from eyestrain and tension headaches? Would you like to learn a simple method for relaxing your vision and stimulating your natural posture? Would you like that advice in less than the time it took Lincoln to say the Gettysburg address? If so, click the video above and learn how you can take a big step towards decreasing overall tension in your face and head. This is a vitally important topic given how many hours a day we are all now looking at screens, many of which are getting smaller.   This…continue reading →
Raising Self-Confidence in Teenagers through the Alexander Technique

Raising Self-Confidence in Teenagers through the Alexander Technique

A couple years ago, a quiet 17-year-old who I’ll call Len, was referred to me by his mother for a course of Alexander Technique lessons. She had heard that the AT could improve his posture and help him focus. Nearly 6’4” – and still growing – he stood and sat with a pronounced slump, which was likely contributing to back pain. His mother also suspected that his slouch was, partially, an attempt to not “stick out” at school. Being reminded to “sit up straight” was not helping Len. He resisted an upright, healthy…continue reading →
Three Reasons Why I Meditate (And Why You Should Consider It Too)

Three Reasons Why I Meditate (And Why You Should Consider It Too)

1) Meditation reinforces a dignified, noble posture which has innumerable health benefits. It’s one of the few activities practiced in America for which an elegant stature is encouraged (equestrian sports and classical piano are others). When we are in good posture, our spine is efficiently supporting the weight of our skull, our lungs have room to operate, and our digestive path is not compressed. 2) I am off duty from “doing.” As an entrepreneur and parent of a young child, there’s always a long (glaring) list of unfinished tasks. But when I’m meditating,…continue reading →
Good Posture Means Connecting, Not Correcting

Good Posture Means Connecting, Not Correcting

I'm not against correcting our posture or body on principle. I wish all it took to rid ourselves of chronic pain and tension was figuring the right angle or position, and tapping our body into place. It's such a seductive offer; that we need only arrange our body and then get on with the rest of our day. I object to correcting our posture on practical grounds; it doesn't work. From my perspective as an Alexander Technique teacher and a person dealing with chronic pain for several years, 'correcting' posture tends to tie…continue reading →
Conquer Fear of Water and Manage Chronic Pain: Swimming and the Alexander Technique

Conquer Fear of Water and Manage Chronic Pain: Swimming and the Alexander Technique

The Alexander Technique is a set of skills that helps improve our performance with less stress and tension. It's a natural complement to swimming. By applying the AT to swimming, students have been able to overcome fear, stroke with greater efficiency, and breathe easily. That's why I am offering a special – you guessed it – Surf & Turf package that combines the two. The Alexander Technique helps to:  Improve the body's coordination, from as "simple" a movement as sitting, to swimming the front crawl.  Improve posture and natural muscle strength.  Dramatically increase…continue reading →

Two Questions to Keep Your Meditation Practice Alive

Meditation has a goal. How could it not? We need some reason to get out of bed in December and inhabit our cushion. Maybe we practice in order to feel more sanity, deal with physical or mental illness, or because we’d like to have something to talk about with our meditation instructor. However, if we don’t check in periodically with the nature of our journey, it’s easy grasp after some “better” state of mind or posture. Let’s say I’m having what feels like a lousy meditation session; my mind is ungovernable, like a…continue reading →
Posture, Eating, and the Stars of Downton Abbey

Posture, Eating, and the Stars of Downton Abbey

I was recently interviewed by the website youbeauty.com about the relationship between posture and healthy eating. Our conversation quickly turned to the British sensation, Downton Abbey (yes, I have watched many episodes…). Here's an excerpt: "The teasers are out, but you've still got five months before season five of Downton Abbey airs. In the meantime, here's a way to make your obsession with the show a lot more productive: Eat like a Crawley. "Just watch how any of the 'upstairs' family at Downton Abbey eats or drinks tea: with a regal uprightness that preserves…continue reading →
The Approach: Healthy Sitting Posture at Work

The Approach: Healthy Sitting Posture at Work

Last night in the final class of Compassion & Vitality, one student brought in their computer and we re-created her work set up. She wanted to know how could she work without so much pain and stress? Just re-creating her office set up brought on waves of dread. We began with "The Approach." It was a simple experiment – could we change her working physical patterns (and her dread) by approaching her activity differently? Rather than plop down in the chair and breathlessly begin working as she had done previously, I asked her…continue reading →

Quick Tip for Helping Neck Pain

Here's a quick tip to help with your neck pain. The way we move our head and neck, and even the way we think about our spine and head, determine how much tension accumulates in the neck which often causes pain. In this short video, I'll offer a helpful way of thinking about your neck and head while working and going through your day, so that your head feels less like a bowling ball and more like it's floating on top of your spine. If you're interested in learning more how the body…continue reading →
Your Trashy Postural Habits, and How They Are the Key to Uprightness

Your Trashy Postural Habits, and How They Are the Key to Uprightness

The moment you start thinking you need to meet the world with good posture – it's over; you're screwed. You’ve empowered the belief that being upright means you can’t really be yourself. It’s too easy to jettison our spontaneity and sense of humor in an effort to become a statue of good posture. If we don't give ourselves the chance to see and acknowledge our habits – however slumped or depraved they may feel – we will likely continue to be hounded by them. Here's an example: if I have made slumping "bad,"…continue reading →